Not getting any? FAU study finds American sex habits at all-time low

Not getting any? Join the club.

A new study co-authored by researchers at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton found Americans in all age groups are less sexually active than ever.

Viagra? Hook-up apps? The reported new era of free love seems to have been greatly exaggerated.

Researchers from FAU along with those from San Diego State University and Widener University in Pennsylvania culled data from the General Social Survey of 26,620 American adults from 1989 to 2014. They published their results Tuesday in the journal Archives of Sexual Behavior.

What could she be whispering? According to a new FAU study, most likely it is “Not tonight, I have a headache.” (Photo courtesy of Creative Commons)

Those particular archives sound like some interesting reading.

But anyway, when it comes to making whoopee, there was only bad news with results showing a drop in sexual activity along gender, race, region, work status and education level.

And what about that “marriage advantage?” That no longer holds true as the rate of sexual activity also fell among those who are married or living with partners. The group went from 73 trysts a year in 1990 to 55 in 2014. Single people said they were having more sex a year with an average of 59.

But those who are married don’t need a study to tell them what they already know.

Not surprisingly sexual activity declined with age. People in their 20s reported having sex about 80 times a year, while people 65-years and older reported hooking up about 20 times annually – which is still pretty impressive.

Ryne Sherman, associate professor of psychology at FAU, says maybe people are having less sex these days because they are just simply unhappier. Ouch!

So if we compare generations, who is the friskiest? Researchers say it was those born in the 1930s, known as the Silent Generation. And who are the most chaste? You guessed it. The millennials.

The decline apparently, according to the study, is not associated with hours worked or pornography use either.

The study didn’t look into the popularity of Netflix. Admit it, you rather be watching the “Santa Clarita Diet” than making love.

Overall, two factors seem to be driving declines in sexual frequency.

Here’s Ryne Sherman, an associate professor of psychology at FAU and co-author of the study, delineating the act of love into the least romantic terms imaginable.

“First, an increase in the percentage of people who are unpartnered, which is interesting considering the availability of the Internet and Tinder age; and second, a decrease in sexual frequency among those who are partnered,” said Ryne Sherman, associate professor of psychology at FAU.

“Honey, I was just wondering if … if … if you would like to watch the new episode of “Game of Thrones?” (Creative Commons)
 Maybe, our love-making has fallen because we are more likely to be living alone.

In 1986, 66 percent of American adults had a partner at home, but by 2014 those living with a partner was only 59 percent.

“While we don’t know for certain, we suspect that there are a number of factors that are contributing to this decline including putting off parenthood and parenting later in life, as well as the need for two-income families to make ends meet which can lead to fatigue,” said Sherman.

Oh yes, and there is this little silver lining:

“Also, people are generally less happy now and this may impact their overall satisfaction with their relationships or their marriage,” Sherman said.

Thanks, Sherm. Any other nuggets to cheer up us overworked, sex-deprived, depressed masses in loveless marriages?

The FAU study doesn’t answer this question, however:

Who are these people who tabulate how many times a year they have intercourse? What are they doing, putting notches on their bedpost? Is there a phone app? If not, should we invent one? Curious minds want to know, Sherm. We want to know.

In time of Trump, Max Planck celebrates scientific method with music

It’s not easy being a scientist these days.

In the age of President Trump where “alternative facts” are doled out daily, researchers find themselves derided.

Climate change? It’s an agenda of these rascally scientists to get grant money.

Life-saving vaccines? Trump believes they may be tied to autism despite ample proof they are not.

So for the Max Planck Institute for Neuroscience in Jupiter, its highly popular science and music presentations are a great way to reach out to the public.

The latest is scheduled for Wednesday at 6:15 p.m.  at the Benjamin Upper School in Palm Beach Gardens. It’s free and open to the public but seating is limited so RSVP is required.

“I  think many times the public doesn’t understand science so when we do this outreach with music and whatnot we are playing an active role,” said David Fitzpatrick, chief executive officer and scientific director of Florida’s institute.

“With what has happened in this country, there are many people devaluing science.”

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Emmanuelle Charpentier will speak Wednesday evening at the Max Planck Institute in Jupiter’s Science Meets Music at Benjamin Upper School.

The last Science Meets Music event drew more than 400 people in January. The Post previewed the series earlier this month.

The speaker this time around is one of Time magazine’s 100 most influential people” Emmanuelle Charpentier – which is saying something since there are like 7.5 billion humans on earth.  She will be visiting from Berlin, Germany, where she works for the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology.

For the music portion there will be Emmanuel Ceysson, Principal Harp of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra.

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David Fitzpatrick, chief executive officer and scientific director of Florida’s institute, said:

The star, though, is Charpentier whose work involving a bacterial system has the potential to drastically change treatment of cancer and other ailments. It hasn’t been used on humans yet, but experiments on mice have been very encouraging.

The New York Times reported Charpentier’s discovery of being able to add or delete genes in any type of cell “has sparked a scientific revolution with a seemingly endless list of applications.”

It can hypothetically be used to remove the mutated gene in blood cells of people with sickle cell disease and to replace it with a normal gene, thus curing the disease. Or it can be used to make insect pests unable to reproduce and plants to naturally resist disease.

Fitzpatrick said he hopes by mixing music with science, he can convey how researchers at the institute use the scientific method, that these are passionate individuals who work tirelessly to find the truth.

“Musicians and scientists are many ways very much alike,” he said. “They have a dedication to what they are doing. Scientists do an experiment over and over and over. A musician does the same thing.”

For more information on the 2017 series, or to RSVP, call 561-972-9027.

 

FAU spearheads effort to help intubated patients communicate

Every year, almost 800,000 patients in the United States are intubated with a tube inserted in their body to help them to breathe during hospitalization.

More than 50 percent of these patients are awake and alert, but they are unable to communicate with nurses, physicians and their loved ones save for scribbling on a piece of paper — not exactly conducive to a patient in an emergency medical situation.

Enter the tablet-based communication application called “Speak for Myself,” developed at Florida Atlantic University’s Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing in Boca Raton.

 

 

“Speak for Myself” was developed by Rebecca Koszalinski  during her doctoral studies under the guidance of Ruth Tappen, an eminent scholar and professor at the Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing.

Results of a pilot study of Speak for Myself, conducted at three hospitals in South Florida, was recently published in the journal Computers, Informatics, Nursing. It found there is a  disconnect between what health care providers think patients want to communicate and what patients actually want to say.

“When patients are not able to clearly verbalize their needs, there is an elevated risk of misinterpretation and misunderstanding, which could lead to errors and unintentional poorer quality of care,” Tappen said.

“While writing boards and other traditional methods may be helpful, important information is often lost. Furthermore, allowing others to speak for the patient has its limitations.”

The app lets a patient communicate his or her level of pain using a scale from 1 to 10. It also helps them convey their physical needs such as suctioning, repositioning and requests to use the bathroom.

During the study, one patient using the device was able to help doctors learn that the nasogastric tube had become twisted and was causing severe pain. Another patient communicated her end-of-life decisions to stop treatment and disconnect the mechanical ventilation that was keeping her alive.

“It is accurate to assert that with enhanced communication, patients will have less frustration, their pain will be better controlled, and they will have a greater opportunity to participate in their own care, and this is all supported in our study,” Tappen said.

approximately 1,600 nursing students enrolled in programs at FAU’s College of Nursing.

 

FAU Study: Can sea sponge be a cure for pancreatic cancer?

 

A deep-water marine sponge found off of Fort Lauderdale’s coast contains a compound that can inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancer cells, say  scientists at Florida Atlantic University’s Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute in Fort Pierce.

FAU Harbor Branch Leiodermatium
Could this sponge off the coast of Fort Lauderdale hold the answer to curing pancreatic cancer?

The sponge contains leiodermatolide, a natural product that research shows can block cancer cells from dividing using extremely low concentrations of the compound.

According to a FAU news release, sea sponges are an ancient group of animals that appeared more than 600 million years ago that have many of the same genes as humans.

“These scientists are taking advantage of this similarity in human and sponge genomes to isolate marine natural compounds from these organisms to develop medicines useful in the treatment of human diseases such as cancer,” the release stated.

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Patients have less than a 7 percent survival rate within five years of diagnosis, and 74 percent of patients die within the first year of diagnosis.

The lead author of the study is Esther Guzmán, an associate research professor at FAU Harbor Branch.

ks for treatments for pancreatic cancer and infectious diseases, and their scientists also have collaborations with other scientists working on other forms of cancer, malaria, tuberculosis, neurodegenerative disease and inflammation.

“The primary goal of our marine biomedical and biotechnology program is to discover marine natural products with utility as medicines or as tools to better allow us to understand disease processes,” said Wright.

Sex and Millennials: New FAU study makes surprising finding

With the plethora of social hookup apps and sexually transmitted diseases on the rise, some social scientists have proffered the Millennial generation ushered in a new era of free love.

But a new Florida Atlantic University study blows up that stereotype. In fact, Millennial appear to be as prudish as their great-grandparents.

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Let’s just snuggle. New study finds Millennial are not the hook-up generation – in fact, quite the contrary.

The Boca Raton-based college found many Americans born in the 1990s in particular, are forgoing sex during young adulthood.

The FAU study, just published in the journal Archives of Sexual Behavior, contradicts the widespread stereotype that Millennial are the “hookup” generation that use popular dating apps like Tinder and Grindr.

Millennials are no more promiscuous than their predecessors and are less likely to be having sex than young adults were 30 years ago, according to a survey of almost 27,000 people.

The generation did not report more sexual partners after the age of 18 than GenX’ers born in the late 1960s. In fact, 15 percent of 20- to 24-year-old Americans had no sexual partners since turning 18.

Sherman,Ryne
FAU Associate Professor Ryne Sherman.

The only other generation that showed a higher rate of sexual inactivity were those born in the 1920s, said Ryne Sherman,, co-author of the study and associate professor of psychology in the Charles E. Schmidt College of Science at FAU.

“Many of the differences between the groups in the recent generations were also significant,” said Sherman. “For example, women were more likely to be sexually inactive compared to men, Whites more than Blacks, those who did not attend college more than those who did, and in the East more than the West.”

So why are Millennials not doing the deed?

For one, as the Pew Research Center observed, nearly one-third of today’s young adults are still living at home, largely because of economic factors like lower wages and social ones, like delayed age of first marriage.

“With more [millennials] living with their parents even post-recession, young adults may have fewer opportunities to have sex,” according to a story in The Daily Beast.