In the midst of heroin epidemic, enters new drug dubbed ‘Grey Death’

Florida, shaken to the core by an unprecedented heroin overdose epidemic, may now have to grapple with a brand new deadly opioid mixture dubbed “Grey Death” that utilizes several opioids and looks like concrete.

Mixing  opioids are not new, but West Palm Beach CBS affiliate, Channel 12, calls this particular concoction “the deadliest drug yet.”  It’s already killed people in Georgia and Alabama and it’s heading our way.

When it comes to designer drugs, Martin County seems to be a magnet and Sheriff William Snyder is well aware.

In August, a 19-year-old man high on a bath salt-like drug smashed through the front plate-glass window of a family’s Stuart home and attacked two people, police said.

Snyder says Grey Death looks consists of heroin, fentanyl and other opioids.

“They don’t call it gray death for any other reason other than the fact that it can definitely cause death,” Sheriff Snyder told CBS12.com.

“My prayer is that we never see it here, my expectation is the likelihood is we will see it here in Martin County,” Sheriff Snyder said.

The new drug mixture can be injected, smoked, snorted or swallowed. Snyder has ordered special gear for his deputies when they encounter Gray Death and other strong opioids that can be deadly simply by touching it.

“They will be able to cover all their body, hands, and feet and it will protect them so when they come out of that scene they can take it off, decontaminate and be safe,” Sheriff Snyder said

Read The Palm Beach Post’s coverage of designer drugs by clicking here and the heroin epidemic by clicking here.

 

Surgeon General drops historic report on addiction

UPDATE 12:46 p.m. A half-century ago, the office of the U.S. Surgeon General – the country’s top doctor – issued a report on tobacco that started a cultural shift in a Mad Men-era America where cigarettes were ubiquitous to one today where they are shunned and forever connected to lung cancer.

Now that office under U.S. Surgeon Vice Admiral Dr. Vivek H. Murthy hopes to inspire a similar sea change with its first ever report on addiction. It aims to remove the public stigma of the disease by defining once and for all as a neurological brain disorder that needs to be treated as any other chronic condition.

“My hope with this report is that it will galvanize our country to address the addiction crisis,” Murthy said in a press availability today.

Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs and Health, comes the same day as the online release of The Palm Beach Post’s investigation, Heroin: Killer of A Generation, which outlines the scope of an epidemic that killed 216 people from overdose in the county in 2015.

Much of his findings have been accepted in the recovery community for years, even decades. But Murthy wants the public to understand that addiction is a disease, not one of simple self-control.

Murthy said he aims to change the way America views addiction. “I’m calling out country to action,” he said. “I’m calling for a cultural shift in how we think about addiction, that we recognize that it is not a moral failing.”

He said, in fact, addiction is neurological disorder of the brain and “is not a disease of choice.”

The report states the pressing need for an overhaul in the way the country thinks about addiction, stating that almost 22.5 million people reported using an illegal drug in the last year, 20 million have substance abuse issues and 12.5 million abuse prescription pain pills.

Every day, 78 people die in the U.S. from heroin or heroin-related drugs.

Among other findings is that only 10 percent of those now addicted receive treatment and that the economic impact of drug and alcohol misuse and addiction amounts to $442 billion each year.

One in seven Americans will struggle with some type of alcohol or drug addiction, the report states.

What is needed is a multi-pronged approach of medication, counseling and social support, along with evidence-based interventions to prevent addiction in the first place, according to the report.

Murtha will talk about addiction with other experts at an event later today in Los Angeles.

Without being implicit, the report offers an alternative to incarceration for those suffering from addiction and hails a system of recovery support services – or RSS – to keep recovered addicts from relapsing. The most-well known RSS, the report points out, is Alcoholics Anonymous but there are many  resources.

The report also endorses needle-exchange programs and other solutions, including medication to wean addicts off of heroin.

US Surgeon General Vice Admiral (VADM) Vivek H. Murthy, M.D., M.B.A., center, tours FoundCare in West Palm Beach on February 6, 2015. (Thomas Cordy / The Palm Beach Post)
US Surgeon General Vice Admiral (VADM) Vivek H. Murthy,  tours FoundCare  last year (Thomas Cordy / The Palm Beach Post)

For those on the front-lines battling addiction in Palm Beach County, the report was like the bugle call of the cavalry arriving.

James N. Hall, an epidemiologist at Nova Southeastern University, has been watching heroin’s march through the community for five years.

“This is a landmark report from the Surgeon General of the United States,” he said. “It is an open call for key policy shifts making this a No. 1 public health issue rather than a moral or criminal issue.”

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The new Surgeon General’s report defines addiction as a chronic neurological disorder.

He called on political leaders to “tackle this age-old problem that is more dangerous, more addictive and more deadly in 2016 than any other time in our lives.”

Dr. Anthony Campo is the Medical Director at Caron Renaissance and Ocean Drive. He said the report was “ground-breaking” and “long overdue.”

He thinks the de-stigmatizing of addiction and making treatment more available will go a long way in dealing with the crisis.

“When you look at the figures, overdoses takes a life every 19 minutes,” Campo said. “Criminalizing substance abuse disorders didn’t work. It has to be treatment.”

How Murthy’s report — particularly his call to “invest more” in treatment and prevention – goes over with  President-Elect Donald Trump is unknown.

Trump, though, knows the ravages of addiction.  His brother Freddy, died as an alcoholic in 1981 at the age of 43. As a result, Trump doesn’t drink.

“How we respond to this crisis is a moral test for America,” Murthy said. “Are we a nation willing to take on an epidemic that is causing great human suffering and economic loss? Are we able to live up to that most fundamental obligation we have as human beings: to care for one another?”

Health Care District looks to take on heroin epidemic

As opioid drug overdose deaths increase exponentially, the Health Care District of Palm Beach County — the taxpayer-supported safety net for medical services here — plans to partner up with first responders to help drug abusers in crisis.

Hypodermic needles mixed with cigarette butts and empty prescription bottles found in the trash at a cottage apartment rented by Jean Thomas, 83, in West Palm Beach's Prospect Park neighborhood. (Thomas Cordy / The Palm Beach Post)

It’s a big first step for the district that already runs the Trauma Hawk air ambulance, Lakeside Medical Center in Belle Glade and primary care clinics and school nurses, among other services.

The opioid epidemic has been fueled by prescription pill abuse and the mixing of powerful synthetic opioids like fentanyl with heroin by traffickers and dealers to increase potency and profit.

The district this week applied for a $10 million state grant over five years from the Department of Children & Families that would allow it initially to provide services to addicts at their most vulnerable: right when they overdose and are taken to hospital emergency rooms.

The district will partner up with Southeast Florida Behavioral Health Network, the Palm Beach Sheriff’s Office, Palm Beach Fire-Rescue, as well as hospital emergency rooms.

The first stage of the plan is to get addicts in crisis who have been stabilized to an open bed at a local detox or drug recovery center.

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Darcy Davis, CEO of the Health Care District of Palm Beach County, says it is time to tackle the heroin epidemic.

The Health Care District is also not just focusing on poor and homeless drug abusers, aiming to help any community drug users who needs to navigate the drug rehabilitation and insurance industries to get treatment, as well as providing those without means an avenue for recovery.

But the district’s CEO Darcy Davis says the second phase of the plan will establish a “centralized receiving facility” that would not only provide treatment for addicts but also mental health services.

“We recognize the opioid crisis is significant and we need to act as quickly as possible to respond,” she said. “And you have to start somewhere. It’s a huge problem. We feel like we need to get involved.”

Read more about the Health Care District’s plans to expand into addiction services this weekend in the Palm Beach Post.

And read our coverage of the heroin epidemic by clicking here.

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